For Lack of a Better Name.

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The player scrapbooks forum is literally a place for writers to warm-up, brainstorm, keep little scraps of notes, or just post things to encourage themselves and each other. Each player can feel free to create their own thread - one per account - and use them accordingly.

For Lack of a Better Name.

Postby Arxad on August 1st, 2012, 8:57 am

WELL THEN.


I'm not even entirely sure why I'm making this yet, so I thought I'd just think of things to type as I go. So uhh.... Yeaaaahhhh. -Whistles awkwardly for a while- Oh yeah... Guess I should start off with the formalities n' stuff... I'm Luke, or Arxad as my PC would suggest. I'm a completely hopeless computer nerd, playing everything from world of warcraft to Call of Duty to, well, this. Not that it's a bad thing or anything, it just makes me a little bit of a shut-in. Thats what Skype is for, I suppose :D

So, I've got two characters so far. Arxad, who is obviously the account I'm on right now. Hes a Kelvic Grizzly Bear whos trying to find someone to bond with. And then, theres Valen. (Brand new, still making a CS for him :P) Hes going to be a Human/Vantha living in Syrilas. Hoping to make him a bard if thats allowed. I haven't gotten around to asking yet. Anyways, I'll be posting in this scrapbook on both accounts, depending on which one I'm on at the time that I feel like posting.

I think that's all for now. I might jot down a few notes for a "to do list" maybe later or tomorrow :/ I'll see how lazy I'm feeling. I think I'm going to have to end this post with something mildly amusing...

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There will come a time when someone needs you, and you need them. Remember that the bonds you make with that person will last a lifetime; They shall never be severed. Defend them with your life, and love them with your heart.
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For Lack of a Better Name.

Postby Arxad on August 2nd, 2012, 8:57 am

Alright Then


I suppose it's about time I got some things organized here... Let's see, I need a to-do list. Yeah, that'll do for now.

Okay, so on my to-do list,

Start a thread with Nij and Anterra
Finish my CS for Valen
Start a Character Journal for Valen
Brainstorm ideas for Character History for Valen (I know, too many things about Valen, but hey, I like being detailed :D)
Find/create a banner for Valen
Find/create a better banner for Arxad
Think of a snappy title to give Arxad
Gather up lots of amusing rodent pictures


That about sums up my To-Dos for now. I guess I'll leave you with yet another amusing rodent picture.

Image
There will come a time when someone needs you, and you need them. Remember that the bonds you make with that person will last a lifetime; They shall never be severed. Defend them with your life, and love them with your heart.
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Arxad
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Posts: 18
Words: 8668
Joined roleplay: July 24th, 2012, 9:25 am
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For Lack of a Better Name.

Postby Arxad on August 19th, 2012, 7:55 am

So, I heard this story/poem earlier this week, and it really hit me hard. I don't know how to describe it, but it was almost like something inside me snapped, and my walls just came crashing down, so to speak. Here it is.





I saw a strange sight. I stumbled upon a story most strange, like nothing my life, my street sense, my sly tongue had ever prepared me for.

Hush, child. Hush, now, and I will tell it to you.

Even before the dawn one Friday morning I noticed a young man, handsome and strong, walking the alleys of our City. He was pulling an old cart filled with clothes both bright and new, and he was calling in a clear, tenor voice: “Rags!” Ah, the air was foul and the first light filthy to be crossed by such sweet music.

“Rags! New rags for old! I take your tired rags! Rags!”

“Now, this is a wonder,” I thought to myself, for the man stood six-feet-four, and his arms were like tree limbs, hard and muscular, and his eyes flashed intelligence. Could he find no better job than this, to be a ragman in the inner city?

I followed him. My curiosity drove me. And I wasn’t disappointed.

Soon the Ragman saw a woman sitting on her back porch. She was sobbing into a handkerchief, sighing, and shedding a thousand tears. Her knees and elbows made a sad X. Her shoulders shook. Her heart was breaking.

The Ragman stopped his cart. Quietly, he walked to the woman, stepping round tin cans, dead toys, and Pampers.

“Give me your rag,” he said so gently, “and I’ll give you another.”

He slipped the handkerchief from her eyes. She looked up, and he laid across her palm a linen cloth so clean and new that it shined. She blinked from the gift to the giver.

Then, as he began to pull his cart again, the Ragman did a strange thing: he put her stained handkerchief to his own face; and then HE began to weep, to sob as grievously as she had done, his shoulders shaking. Yet she was left without a tear.

“This IS a wonder,” I breathed to myself, and I followed the sobbing Ragman like a child who cannot turn away from mystery.

“Rags! Rags! New rags for old!”

In a little while, when the sky showed grey behind the rooftops and I could see the shredded curtains hanging out black windows, the Ragman came upon a girl whose head was wrapped in a bandage, whose eyes were empty. Blood soaked her bandage. A single line of blood ran down her cheek.

Now the tall Ragman looked upon this child with pity, and he drew a lovely yellow bonnet from his cart.

“Give me your rag,” he said, tracing his own line on her cheek, “and I’ll give you mine.”

The child could only gaze at him while he loosened the bandage, removed it, and tied it to his own head. The bonnet he set on hers. And I gasped at what I saw: for with the bandage went the wound! Against his brow it ran a darker, more substantial blood – his own!

“Rags! Rags! I take old rags!” cried the sobbing, bleeding, strong, intelligent Ragman.

The sun hurt both the sky, now, and my eyes; the Ragman seemed more and more to hurry.

“Are you going to work?” he asked a man who leaned against a telephone pole. The man shook his head.

The Ragman pressed him: “Do you have a job?”

“Are you crazy?” sneered the other. He pulled away from the pole, revealing the right sleeve of his jacket – flat, the cuff stuffed into the pocket. He had no arm.

“So,” said the Ragman. “Give me your jacket, and I’ll give you mine.”

Such quiet authority in his voice!

The one-armed man took off his jacket. So did the Ragman – and I trembled at what I saw: for the Ragman’s arm stayed in its sleeve, and when the other put it on he had two good arms, thick as tree limbs; but the Ragman had only one.

“Go to work,” he said.

After that he found a drunk, lying unconscious beneath an army blanket, and old man, hunched, wizened, and sick. He took that blanket and wrapped it round himself, but for the drunk he left new clothes.

And now I had to run to keep up with the Ragman. Though he was weeping uncontrollably, and bleeding freely at the forehead, pulling his cart with one arm, stumbling for drunkenness, falling again and again, exhausted, old, old, and sick, yet he went with terrible speed. On spider’s legs he skittered through the alleys of the City, this mile and the next, until he came to its limits, and then he rushed beyond.

I wept to see the change in this man. I hurt to see his sorrow. And yet I needed to see where he was going in such haste, perhaps to know what drove him so.

The little old Ragman – he came to a landfill. He came to the garbage pits. And then I wanted to help him in what he did, but I hung back, hiding. He climbed a hill. With tormented labor he cleared a little space on that hill. Then he sighed. He lay down. He pillowed his head on a handkerchief and a jacket. He covered his bones with an army blanket. And he died.

Oh, how I cried to witness that death! I slumped in a junked car and wailed and mourned as one who has no hope – because I had come to love the Ragman. Every other face had faded in the wonder of this man, and I cherished him; but he died. I sobbed myself to sleep.

I did not know – how could I know? – that I slept through Friday night and Saturday and its night, too.

But then, on Sunday morning, I was wakened by a violence.

Light – pure, hard, demanding light – slammed against my sour face, and I blinked, and I looked, and I saw the last and the first wonder of all. There was the Ragman, folding the blanket most carefully, a scar on his forehead, but alive! And, besides that, healthy! There was no sign of sorrow nor of age, and all the rags that he had gathered shined for cleanliness.

Well, then I lowered my head and trembling for all that I had seen, I myself walked up to the Ragman. I told him my name with shame, for I was a sorry figure next to him. Then I took off all my clothes in that place, and I said to him with dear yearning in my voice: “Dress me.”

He dressed me. My Lord, he put new rags on me, and I am a wonder beside him. The Ragman, the Ragman, the Christ!






I hope anyone who reads this finds this as amazing as I do, despite your views on religion.
There will come a time when someone needs you, and you need them. Remember that the bonds you make with that person will last a lifetime; They shall never be severed. Defend them with your life, and love them with your heart.
User avatar
Arxad
Player
 
Posts: 18
Words: 8668
Joined roleplay: July 24th, 2012, 9:25 am
Race: Kelvic
Character sheet
Journal


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