Completed It's Your Turn, Karyk

Work Thread #2

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Center of scholarly knowledge and shipwrighting, Zeltiva is a port city unlike any other in Mizahar. [Lore]

It's Your Turn, Karyk

Postby Karyk on April 19th, 2017, 1:10 am

Timestamp: Spring 6, 517

Karyk crossed the threshold into the shipyard, pack on both shoulders, his bundle of axes tucked under his arm, arriving early as he always did. Raegher, his foreman was already there at their project site, a large sloop that had not been named yet. She stood tall, three masts, long, dark hull. Her sails and rigging hadn't yet been installed, but she was functional in every other aspect. The next few days would be dedicated to the decorative accessories, the rails, figurehead, windows, doors, and the like.

As Karyk moved over to a crate, to claim 'his' spot, Raegher waved him over. Karyk nodded, a silent way of asking what he wanted. "It's your turn, Karyk." Karyk stared him in the eyes to see if he was joking, but he wasn't. He wanted to complain, considering it was just his turn two tendays ago. But he stayed silent. He turned on his heel, and moved toward an area full of saw dust, saw horses, and piles of small strips and planks and leftover pieces of wood of various sizes.

It was his turn to build the rowboat.

Most ships have a few rowboats, for getting to islands without docks, for lifeboats, for romantic late night jaunts, the usual. As such, everyone took turns building them, since there always seemed to be a backlog. There was even a warehouse of them in the shipyard since some captains preferred certain styles or sizes. At least he didn't have to build the oars too.

He arrived at the designated workshop area, an open air space. There were various stools there for people of differing heights to work with. Karyk set his gear down and stretched, groaning. It was going to be a tedious day. He rolled up his sleeves, and moved over to the thick wood pile. He needed to find a good piece for the stem. Needed to be about a half arm length, half that wide, and slightly thicker than his finger. He knelt down in the pile, tossing pieces to and fro, always finding flaws in them. One was cut cross grain, several were to small in some aspect. He did find one that was just about perfect, until he found the knot that was in it. Why would anyone even keep that? Not having much luck, he kicked a log in frustration. It struck the pile, which cascaded down the opposite side. Karyk groaned, more to clean up. Maybe. He might just leave it for the next person to get oar duty, since that came with cleaning too.

But there it was. The perfect piece of wood, sticking straight up out of the pile. He reached over and grabbed it. He held it up in the light, examining it. He'd have to cut it down a bit, but all in all, it was perfect. He sat down on a stool, that wobbled a bit. Annoyed he looked down at the legs, to see if it was sitting on anything. It wasn't. He sighed. He looked around, found a wedge, and worked it under the short leg and tested it. Satisfied enough, he put the wood across his lap, and unrolled his axe bundle. He picked up his carving axe and checked it over. The handle was still good, not warped or cracked, no splinters either. The head was still tight, no rust, the edge still just the right amount of sharpness.

Holding his hand high on the neck of his axe, he carefully started slicing at the edges of the wood along the length. The shavings fell away as he pushed the blade along, constantly holding it up to the light to make sure he was keeping it even all around. Slowly he shaved more and more away, until he finished it off with two triangular shaped grooves on each end of it. The stem was now done. He set it down nearby and stood up, stretching his back from being slightly hunched over for a bit.

He moved over to the wood piles once more, finding a suitable piece for his next step. The stern. This piece was almost a full arm length, slightly less than a half arm wide, and a finger width thick. Using his carving axe once more, he shaved it down to the perfect size, then cut a tiny notch into one side of it. He held it up, eyeballing it, for the side he'd notched would have to be shorter than the opposite side, with a slope connecting them. Satisfied, he started to cut away the area that would be sloped, using careful cuts so as to not crack the wood or chip away pieces unnecessarily. Small slicing stroke after stroke, the slope took shape. He kept holding it up, checking that it was right, shaving a knick there, smoothing a side here, until he finally had it just right.

He grabbed a board of the same thickness and width, but was about twice as long, and cut it in the same fashion, making it into a cross board. He set the cross board and stern next to the stem, standing up, wiping away the sweat on his brow. Standing up, he went over to the planks pile, grabbing two planks that were a bit longer than twice his height. These would serve as the side boards, and would be a decent bit of the skeleton.

He cut the two side boards down to the same length, and then grabbed the stem. He trimmed down one end of each of the side boards so that they could fit into the notches of the stem he'd carved earlier. He pushed them into the notches noting how snugly they fit. He pulled them free, continuing to smooth out the notches and grooves, fitting them into the stem, until finally they were truly flush with the end of the notches. He reached over and grabbed his hammer and the bucket of nails that was always here, nearly all of which were a bit rusty and reused.

He lined the nails up so that when driven through, they'd connect the protruding notched ends. He tapped a small divot into each spot he wanted to drive a nail. Then he held the nail firmly, just below the head, and gave it a firm whack with the hammer. The nail drove in a fair ways. Whack, whack, thump. And the nail was driven in fully. He continued this, until the ends were connected, as well as the side boards being nailed to the stem.

He slumped back on his stool, ready for a break.
Last edited by Karyk on May 14th, 2017, 9:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Karyk
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It's Your Turn, Karyk

Postby Karyk on April 19th, 2017, 4:15 am

While sitting back, Karyk could see how much time he had spent being focused and nit picking his work. Syna was high in the sky now, and when there had been only been a few people before, the yard was in full hustle and bustle now. No one laughed or teased Karyk for getting one of the shyke jobs for the day, for everyone knew it would be their turn sooner or later. It was an inevitable fate of the yard, and they all shared the burden equally.

Sighing, he knew it was time to get back to it. He put the cross board halfway between the side boards, which now began to bend. He eyeballed the bend on each side, then pulled the cross board out. He began shaving down the ends ever so slightly so they'd match the curve and be flush against the side boards. Once more he set the cross board inside and bent the side boards around it. One side wasn't quite flush, he'd made it uneven. Grunting, he picked it out, and began shaving it down yet again to even it out. Yet again, he set it in to check it, and this time everything was flush.

He tipped the whole frame on its side, and pulled some rope from his pack. He wrapped it around the unconnected ends of the side boards, and tied a square knot around it, to keep the boards bent while he nailed the cross board in place. He grabbed a few more nails, tapped his divots into place. Then whack, whack, whack, thunk. Over and over until the starboard side was nailed in place. He then flipped the frame over and repeated the process for the port side.

He loosened the rope and was satisfied to see the side boards bowing the proper way, and not busting any nails, cracking, or slipping. He grabbed the stern board and slipped it into place, and once more tied it all up. He nailed the side boards to the stern and loosened the rope. It was flush on the outside of the boat but there was a bit of a gap in the interior. It wouldn't affect it structurally, she'd still be sea worthy, but it was an error in his work. He didn't check the boards before nailing. He could've beveled the stern board to make it more flush. He'd make sure to remember that for next time. He flipped the entire frame upside down.

Karyk grabbed several planks now, and began cutting them down shorter. Then very carefully he shaved their longer edges so they'd be beveled and fit flush against one another. Then one by one, he lined them up, and hammered them into the boat. He had to be extra precise with his nail placements, since he was nailing them into the side boards and into each other. Any wrong placement or alignment and the entire boat might not be sealed. With each swing, his anxiety grew, not wanting to have to strip the boards and start over.

But they came together nicely. The beveling let them seal together well. Karyk smiled. It looked seaworthy. He began getting real close, shaving here and there where the boards met, so as to give them more of a curve rather than and edge. It was slow, tedious work, but shaving after shaving fell away. Once he finished, he stood up, stretching, Syna on her downward path for the day.

Karyk made his way over to one of the many tar stations the yard kept set up. He dunked a bucket into the thick sludge, kept warm by a low burning fire under the cauldron, thickened with rope threads. He grabbed a thin caulking brush and a wedge tool. He made his way back to his boat and crawled up underneath it, it sitting on the saw horses. He nudged the wedge tool between the edges of two boards, tapped it very lightly with his mallet, so that it just pried open the space just a hair. Then using a small brush from his kit, he dipped it into the tar, and applied as much as he could into the gap. Then he tapped it further down the seam. As it moved away from the tarred spots, those sealed, becoming truly water tight, and opening new spots.

Slowly he made his way through every seam in the boat. This step had to be last because the tight fit of the wood was needed first to ensure a proper seal. And it was a royal pain in the ass to remove the boards after they'd been tar sealed. Any time he applied too much, he scraped it away after it squelched out, and wiped it down with a rag. No need for sloppy work. It took many bells, but he finally finished, his back cramping from being under that damn boat for so long. He pulled him out from under it and stood up. She was definitely seaworthy now.

He went and grabbed some metal oar mounts from the bin, and hammered them into the sides, four in total. He then added two more smaller cross boards for additional seating. He double checked all of his edges, smoothing them out by shaving. He went and grabbed four ours, put them in the mounts, and closed them down. She was ready.

But of course this job wasn't done yet.

She wasn't truly ready until she'd been tested. He grabbed a couple of other workers to help him carry it over to the water. They heaved it up with mild grunts with him, then they all slowly, carefully rolled it over, making sure to not smack each other in the head with the oars, or to drop it. They walked her over to the nearest dock and set her in. Karyk climbed in, carefully so as to not dump himself into the bay, or crack his skull off the dock. He sat in the front of the boat, nodding at those that helped him, as they left for the day, Syna soon to give way to Leth.

Karyk gripped both oars, stuck his boots against the center cross board, and readied himself with a deep breath. He held the oars parallel to the water, then slowly pushed the handles forward and up, so they dipped into the water. Then he pulled them down and back toward him in a circular motion, and she moved. He dipped them in again, feeling the resistance of the water fighting him. But he pushed and pulled against Laviku's grasp, his arms and back and chest already straining from the full day's work, coupled with his sloppy rowing technique. He managed to mostly move forward with a slightly lilt to his dominant side. He constantly looked over his shoulder to make sure he wasn't about to be ran over by a sloop or catamaran.

Once he was out far enough, huffing and puffing as his lungs burned, he stopped to rest, floating in the waves. He looked all around the boat, looking for any signs of cracking or leaking and was pleased to have found none. He'd had to swim back before, though not for several years. It was basically a rite of passage for the ship yard. Yet again stretching his arms and chest, and rotating at the shoulder, Karyk prepared for the trip back. It took him a bit to remember how to turn the damnable thing, but once he had it pointing in the right direction, he powered her forward as best he could.

He was red in the face as he pushed, and pulled, even getting his legs moving in rhythm too. Push, raise, dip, pull through the water. Push, raise, dip, pull through the water. Coast for a bit. Repeat. He picked up a bit too much speed without the control of his boat, and bumped into the side of the dock from which he'd left. It scuffed the side of the boat a decent bit, nothing too jarring and certainly not the worst blemish for a row boat. Just another sign of him not being completely focused on the task at hand. Because gods above he was tired now. He just wanted a nice pint of kelp, some fish, and to fall face first into his bed.

He slipped the oars into the boat, tied a bowline around the stern mount that stuck up from the ship, then tied the boat to the dock. Then he gripped a dock post and pulled himself out, sweaty and relieved. His turn was over, and someone else could have the next blasted one. He stumbled over to his gear, still trying to gain his breath back. He checked his tools thoroughly with the last bits of Syna's light, then packed them away. Slipping his pack over his shoulders, his axe bundle in one arm, he left. The kelp bar was his next stop, and hopefully he had the energy to get home and sleep. But his turn was done.
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Karyk
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It's Your Turn, Karyk

Postby Salara Kel'Halavath on June 8th, 2017, 2:14 pm

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Your Thread Award!


Player One: Karyk Southwind

  • XP:
    +3 Ship Building
    +5 Carpentry
    +1 Observation
    +2 Organization
    +1 Planning
    +1 Salvaging
    +1 Body Building

  • Lore:
    Building a rowboat: someone's gotta do it
    Row boats of all styles are handy and in demand
    Knot all wood is good: Selecting the perfect piece.
    Ensure tools and equipment are in good working order
    An onerous job is still worth doing a job well done, but practice makes perfect
    Attention to detail: Precision is important in boat building
    Tar well for a tight seal, otherwise you're sunk
    Row Row Row your Boat is tough when you're tired

  • Notes:
Another fine detail for shipbuilding! Karyk is a dependable hard worker and sure knows his stuff.

Please don't forget to update your request as Graded.

As always, if you have a concern
or need a change, feel free to PM me!
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Salara Kel'Halavath
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