Painting Skill Interest

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Painting Skill Interest

Postby Firenze on June 29th, 2015, 2:51 pm

Image

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I will be continuing the write up for this Skill. Any help is welcome! I've already got some of the information written up and will be adding it to the Skill in the Workshop.

Just wanted to bump this so if anyone wants to contribute it'll be more easily available.
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Painting Skill Interest

Postby Firenze on June 29th, 2015, 6:17 pm

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Found resource: Common and uncommon paint binders and emulsions, as well as natural paints.

Placing this here as a reference.
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Painting Skill Interest

Postby Firenze on July 10th, 2015, 9:33 pm

Image

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Here is all I have worked up so far. I will be adding more as I go along, any criticisms or additions that anyone wants to toss out please let me know :]


Outline:
I. Overview

II. Related Skills
    II.I Drawing - Although drawing is not required to paint it can aide in perspective, working out detail and placement of the desired look.
    II.II Cooking - These skills may be needed if the painter is wanting to create their own pigments. It is not required because pigments can be obtained without having to create them.
    II.III Geology - Can be a useful skill for an Expert or Master in their skill. Knowledge of minerals and where to locate them to create more unique pigments is beneficial to more advanced artists. It is not required as the pigments can still be bought without having to process, however this can give a better accuracy for the desired color.
    II.IIII Botany - For almost the same reasons as having the Geology skill, Botany can be useful in the gathering of plants, berries, nuts and anything in nature that could possibly be turned into coloring. The higher the level in Botany the more likely to be able to acquire the more difficult to find plants, the larger color spectrum that will be accessible.

III. Color Palettes
Color Palettes are generally referred to as a color wheel or color circle. On the color wheel there are primary, secondary and tertiary colors. Red, blue and yellow are of the primary colors. Orange, green and violet (also referred to as purple) are part of the secondary colors. Tertiary colors are red–orange, red–violet, yellow–orange, yellow–green, blue–violet and blue–green. To acquire secondary and tertiary colors, primary colors are mixed to produce the secondary palette and the secondary colors then mixed to create the tertiary. Primary colors are the most basic, however in Mizahar can sometimes be the most difficult to acquire or create.

III.I Warm
Colors that are considered to be warm generally consist of reds, oranges, yellows; However, browns and tans can be included as well. This color range can incite feelings of warmth or heat, arousal or stimulate and can even have psychological and emotional effect. The effects of this can be attributed to the higher saturation and lighter value of warm pigments versus cool pigments. Warm colors can appear more active in painting than the cooler colors.

III.II Cool
Using a cool color palette will generally consist of using blues, greens, violets and most grays. Cool colors can also have a psychological and emotion effect if used in an efficient context. These colors will generally tend to recede and give a feeling of calm or relaxation.

III.III Neutral
Any color that lack a strong chromatic content is considered unsaturated, achromatic, near neutral, or neutral. Near neutrals include browns, tans, pastels and darker colors and can be of any hue or lightness. Achromatic or neutral colors include black, white and all grays. These colors can be obtained from mixing “pure colors” with white, black or gray, or mixing two complementary colors. Black and white combine with almost any color; black decreases saturation or brightness of a color that is mixed with it, whereas white will give hues of any color combined with it.

IV. Color Creation
Image
    A. Primary Colors:
      a. Red - Is created by mixing a red based pigment with a binder. It is a primary color and is a directly derived pigment. No further mixing or processing is required to acquire this color.

      b. Blue - Is created by mixing a blue based pigment with a binder. It is a primary color and is a directly derived pigment. No further mixing or processing is required to acquire this color.

      c. Yellow - Is created by mixing a yellow based pigment with a binder. It is a primary color and is a directly derived pigment. No further mixing or processing is required to acquire this color.

B. Secondary Colors:

    a. Green - By mixing blue and yellow primary colors together you can create many different shades of green. Depending on the amount of either color used will determine the tint of the color of green. By mixing more blue into the yellow you can tint the green to make it darker, but it will also lean more toward the tertiary color of blue-green if mixed too heavily. The same goes for adding more yellow and less blue, this will give the green a lighter tint, but will lean more toward a yellow-green.

    b. Orange - By mixing red and yellow primary colors together you can create many different shades of orange. Depending on the amount of either color used will determine the tint of the color of orange. By mixing more red into the yellow you can tint the orange to make it darker, but it will also lean more toward the tertiary color of red-orange if mixed too heavily. The same goes for adding more yellow and less red, this will give the orange a lighter tint, but will lean more toward a yellow-orange.

    c. Violet - By mixing blue and red primary colors together you can create many different shades of violet, also known as purple. Depending on the amount of either color used will determine the tint of the color of violet. By mixing more blue into the red you can tint the purple to make it darker, but it will also lean more toward the tertiary color of blue-violet if mixed too heavily. The same goes for adding more red and less blue, this will give the violet a lighter tint, but will lean more toward a red-violet.

C. Tertiary Colors:
    a. Red-Orange - This can be made when trying to create the secondary colors by adding more red to yellow, instead of having equal parts of red and yellow it would be two parts red and one part yellow.

    b. Red-Violet - This can be made when trying to create the secondary colors by adding more red to blue, instead of having equal parts of red and blue it would be two parts red and one part blue.

    c. Yellow-Orange - This can be made when trying to create the secondary colors by adding more yellow to red, instead of having equal parts of red and yellow it would be two parts yellow and one part red.

    d. Yellow-Green - This can be made when trying to create the secondary colors by adding more yellow to blue, instead of having equal parts of blue and yellow it would be two parts yellow and one part blue.

    e. Blue - Violet - This can be made when trying to create the secondary colors by adding more blue to red, instead of having equal parts of red and blue it would be two parts blue and one part red.

    f. Blue-Green - This can be made when trying to create the secondary colors by adding more blue to yellow, instead of having equal parts of blue and yellow it would be two parts blue and one part yellow.

D. Neutrals:

    a. Brown - Created by mixing 10% red and 2% yellow to make a dark orange, add 5-10% blue and then continue to add in blue until creating the desired brown, however, by adding too much color it can make a muddy black. Can also be created by using green and then slowly adding red. Mixing all three primary colors together can also create a darker brown.

    b. Black - Mixing colors is not the best way to create black but it is possible. All primary colors mixed together will make an imperfect black. If it's too green, add red; too brown, add blue; too purple, add yellow. Another way to create black is by mixing a warm color and a cool color together, i.e. red and blue, which side of the spectrum the black will lean toward depends on the balance of the colors in the mixture. Sometimes it can be beneficial to create black this way, most commonly used for shadows or shading it can help to bring together colors in a painting.

    c. White - Unfortunately, since white is a subtractive color when mixing paints there is no way to merge any color together to create this color.

IV.I Gathering Colors
    A. Primary Colors:
      a. Red -
        1. Berries (Fruit) - Generally the easiest source of pigment, however not as reliable on longevity as that of the rubia roots. Any red fruit or berry can be used to tint/paint almost any surface. These can be found in every region.

        2. Rubia Tinctorum roots aka alizarin (Plant) - Can be found in every region, except Eyktol. This is the most commonly used for creating red pigments of varying shades.

        3. Kermes Vermilio (Insect) - Found in kermes oak trees which can be found in most locations of the Sylira, Kalea and Cyphrus regions as well as Taloba. Can be found in almost any forest.

        4. Cochineal (Insect) - An insect found in tropical and subtropical areas such as Cyphrus, Falyndar, Mura and Sahova.

        5. Iron Oxide (Mineral) - Can be found in any region. Iron oxide can be found on the surface of raw Iron that has begun to oxidize, also known as rust.

        6. Cinnebar (Plant) - Tree only found in desert like environments. Eyktol is one of the only places this can be acquired.

        7. Brazilin from Sapanwood (Plant) - Survives mostly in hotter climates. Generally found in regions such as Cyphrus and Eyktol.

        8. Brazilin from Brazilwood (Plant) - Most commonly found in Cyphrus and Eyktol. Can be rarely found in forest environments.

        9. Redwood (Plant) - Most commonly found in Kalea, Southern Taldera, northern Sylira and parts of The Spire. Grind into sawdust and mix with an alkaline solution to create a steady pigment.

        10. Crozophora Tinctoria (Plant) - A desert plant that is fond of the Ektol region and some of Cyphrus. May rarely be found in the Island Nations. This plant can be used as either blue or red depending on the pH levels used during the creation process.

        11. Pterocarpus Draco (Plant) - Also known as Rhysolsblood the sap from the outside of the berries creates a gummy resin, the best way to gather the resin is by steaming or rubbing in coarse canvas bags. Only found on the Island Nations.

      b. Blue -
        1. Azurite (Mineral) - Found in many parts of Mizahar in the upper oxidized portions of copper ore deposits.

        2. Cuprorivaite (Mineral) - Rare and difficult to find, generally found with quartz. Can be found in regions of Mizahar that are mountainous.

        3. Lapis Lazuli (Mineral) - Found in deserts, semi-rare stone that can be ground into powder and made into darker blue pigments. Giving a lye bath to this mineral will lighten the color to ultramarine. Most common area found is Ektol.

        4. Crozophora Tinctoria (Plant) - A desert plant that is fond of the Ektol region and some of Cyphrus. May rarely be found in the Island Nations. This plant can be used as either blue or red depending on the pH levels used during the creation process.

        5. Isatis Tinctoria aka Woad (Plant) - This can be located in desert regions, such as Ektol, but has also been found in Cyphrus and drier areas of Sylira.

        6. Indigofera Tinctoria (Plant) - Can be found in almost any region, more abundantly in Sylira, depending on where the plant is located depends on how quickly it develops. The color derived from the leaves of this plant lean more toward purple but is still categorize as blue.

        5. Copper (Mineral) - By using copper sheets and vaporizing with ammonia a crust with appear that is a green-blue, scrape of the residue to make into a pigment powder. Can be acquired in locations where copper is abundant and imported.

      c. Yellow -
        1. Gamboge (Plant) - Collecting of the resin from these trees can be created to make a deep saffron yellow. The trees have to be at least 10 years old before resin can be converted. This tree is found most commonly in Taloba.

        2. Gold Leaf (Mineral) - Composed of 22-23k gold pounded into a thickness of micrometers and one of the most expensive ways to create yellow. Scrapes from the leafs can be powdered and turned into "shell" gold, called this because it's generally stored in shells. Can be found in almost every region but may be more expensive in areas where it is imported, refer to price list.

        3. Lead-tin (Mineral) - Used to create a bright and sunny yellow is also toxic and can lead to lead poisoning. Lead-tin oxide is created by fusing lead, tin and quartz together at 800C, ground and then screened through mesh. Can be found in every area that lead, tin and quartz can be imported.

        4. Lead-Antimonate (Mineral) - Comprised of two different mineral compounds, sal ammoniac and calcined alumina, mixed together, heated slowly for approximately 5 hours and ground into a powder. The result is a very brilliant golden yellow that can be hazardous to health because of the chemicals required to make it. Only available to those with a skill set of expert or higher. Available only in wealthy areas such as Syliras and Nyka where more complex chemicals can be created.

        5. Orpiment (Mineral) - Found in areas where hot-springs, hydro-thermal deposits and volcanic sublimation are since it needs that specific environment to develop and crystallize. Heat with sulfur and grind into powder. This mineral is a form of arsenic and is highly toxic. The chemical make up of this pigment can lead to the ruin of other certain colors; any color created with lead or copper and is corrosive with binding materials.

        6. Ocher (Mineral) - Commonly known as rust colored clay or iron-hydroxide. This can be used raw for yellow or roasted for a brown-red. Found in desert and mountainous regions. Common in Eyktol, can be rarely found in some parts of Kalea, such as Lhavit.

        7. Buckthorn (Plant) - Berries collected from buckthorn can be collected, dried and ground to make a yellow pigment.

    B. Secondary Colors:

      a. Green -
        1. Chrysocolla (Mineral) - Found in copper ore deposits and is more of a cyan color than natural green. Can be ground into a powder with some difficulty. Found in most areas of Kalea, some areas of Falyndar.

        2. Malachite (Mineral) - Also found in copper ore deposits, this leans heavily toward blue but is still considered a hue of green. The stone can be ground into powder with some effort. Available in Kalea and some places of Falyndar.

        3. Buckthorn (Plant) - Berries collected from buckthorn can be collected when ripe, dried, ground into a powder and mixed with alum to create a rich dark green. Many species of this tree can be found in temperate and subtropical regions. This tree can be found in Taloba, Alvadas and most of the Sylira region.

        4. Celadonite (Mineral) - A cold green that can be found in small deposits in rock. Kind of rare as it takes time to develop. Can be collected in part of Lhavit, most of Kalea and Falyndar regions, and very rarely in Riverfall.

        5. Copper (Mineral) - By using copper sheets and vaporizing with vinegar, wine or urine and scraping the residual corrosion to make a "salt green". Can be acquired in locations where copper is abundant and imported.

      b. Orange -
        1. Realgar (Mineral) - A mineral found alongside orpiment minerals in the same deposit, in areas where hot-springs, hydro-thermal deposits and volcanic sublimation are located. Heat with sulfur and grind into powder. Can be ground into a bright orange pigment. This mineral is a form of arsenic and is highly toxic. The chemical make up of this pigment can lead to the ruin of other certain colors; any color created with lead or copper and is corrosive with binding materials.

        2. Lead-Chromate (Mineral) - Very difficult to make, this pigment is only accessible to those that have quite a bit of mizas to buy it or are very skilled in Philtering. To create this color, vapor alkaline chromate with lead at high temperatures, the crystals formed from the vapors will produce a very deep rich orange. Grind the crystals to powder to produce pigment. Available in only rich areas, such as Sylira, Lhavit and Riverfall.

      c. Violet -
        1. Mollusks/Whelks/Murex Snails - To create purple by this method is very tedious. Small amounts of this pigment are very expensive. Collection of the excrement from mollusks and whelks produce a rich and vibrant purple. Resistant to soaps, lyes and most alkalis and acids, it is a coveted color by most of the higher society. Found mostly in (areas near large bodies of water)

    C. Neutrals:
      a. Brown -
        1. Beechwood (Plant) - There are several different types of beech trees in which the wood is derived from. The root of beechwood is mixed with gum Arabic and water to create the desired color. Most commonly water-based can be converted to oil-based. To convert this to an oil application the painter will need an experience level of competent or above. Almost every region within Mizahar will have at least one species.

        2. Petrol/Oil (Organic Matter) - The coloring from the breakdown process of creating the petrol is naturally brown and can be used directly in oil painting. Can be acquired in most regions.

        3. Bone (Organic Matter) - Bones can be turned into a brown by charring in a furnace, will have a tarry residue that can be hard to work with. Found in every region, most commonly, well populated areas.

        4. Raw Sienna (Mineral) - An earth pigment containing iron oxide and manganese oxide that can be found in desert regions, such as Ektol and parts of Cyphrus. It is naturally made and can be collected and used with a binder to create the yellow-brown. Can be heated to create a more vibrant color. Novices can easily find and use this color.

        5. Raw Umber (Mineral) - This is almost the same as raw sienna, it can be found in the same regions and almost in the same area. The chemical composition is the only thing that makes this different, which alters the color slightly. Can be heated to create a more vibrant color. Novices can easily find and use this color.

        6. Soil/Peat (Organic Matter) - Is one of the easily most accessible sources for brown and can be found in every location in Mizahar. Novices use this as a go-to for their brown coloring. (Note: If mixed with white may have the tendency to turn grey.)

      b. Black -
        1. Bone - Fully charred bone ground into powder can create a popular pigment for black paints. 100% binder is required for this pigment, as all blacks do. Bone and horns can also be charred in a container that has had the air removed to create a more pure black. Can be found in every region and is easily accessible in populated areas.

        2. Wax - The soot remains from tallow or beeswax candles, oil lamps or by burning pitch can be collected and used. Wax is available in most regions of Mizahar.

        3. Charcoal - This is derived from the burning of grapevines and is considered more of a blue-black than pure black. Since grapevines are required to create this it is found where vineyards are able to grow, the most common regions being Sylira, Falyndar, Cyphrus and sparingly on the Island Nations.

      c. White -
        1. Lead - Use extreme caution when using this as it can lead to lead poisoning and death. The purity of the color depends on the purity of the lead, created by "stacking" pots with vinegar and lead and covering in tanbark or dung. Can be acquired or created in almost every region. However, in Eyktol it is going to be more expensive and rare to acquire.

        2. Zinc - When heated to 150C the smoke derived from molten zinc can be collected in a series of chamber to create a "colder" looking white than lead. It also has the side benefit of being more safe to use. Found in every region within Mizahar, may be slightly more expensive in Eyktol.

IV.II Mixing Colors

V. Painting Tools

V.I Substrates

V.II Brushes, Materials, & Uses

VI. Making Pigment - Pigments are granular solids which impart paint its most important properties of color and opacity. Used in paint they are present as fine solid particles that are dispersed, but not soluble, in binder and solvent. Sometimes dyes can be used instead of pigments or in combination with pigments to impart color to the paint. Fillers are a special type of pigment that is used to thicken the film, support its structure and increase the volume of the paint. Fillers are inert materials, such as clay, lime, talc, etc. Creating pigments can be a simple or complex process. One process that is common is using a muller against a slab to grind different sources into powder. The more advanced in related skills the more likely you'll be able to find different sources for pigments. As listed below there are several different types of minerals, herbs, plants and other various means of creating pigments.

VI.I Nuts

VI.II Herbs & Plants
    a. Red - This color can be extracted from the roots of the Rubia plant. It is a long tedious process which will require much skill, as generally required with creating any color of pigment. Method: Grind and powder the dried roots of the rubia plant. Mix one part powder with 40 parts water and mix well. Boil the mixture for approximately 1 bell. Filter through cloth while hot to obtain extracted dyestuffs. Keep the extracts left standing in a room until temperature has dropped sufficiently and the filter through a filter paper. Another way to acquire the pigment to filter the water into jars, leave stand until all water is evaporated, then scrape remnants.
    Second Method: This pertains to using Crozophora Tinctoria and altering the pH level. Extract seeds, squeeze gently to drip the juice onto cloth or canvas. Prior to this the cloth/canvas will need soaked in lime (mineral) water, this will neutralize the acidity of the juice and cause it to turn a light shade of red. Although this is not broken down into a powder form, a binder is not needed and can be directly applied.

    b. Blue - Woad, when steeped, will add a blue hue to water, giving you a faint water-based dye, or can be boiled down into pigments. Method: Harvest leaves of woad plant, tear by hand into strips. Steep the strips in hot water (do not boil) then move the whole pot used to heat leaves into a pot filled with cold water. Stir during this process to keep leaves from breaking down too much. After heated water has cooled, strain liquid, first by cloth then squeeze out excess from the leaves by hand (hands need to be covered). Add 3 teaspoons of sodium carbonate, can be derived from sodium bicarbonate also known as salt, purchase this, process it yourself (which will require Cooking skills) or have it processed for you. Stir mixture for 10 chimes until it develops a blue/green froth. Remove froth and pour liquid into jars. At this point, if you can afford it, you can cover the jars with silk and pour the liquid through the silk to catch most of the pigment, if not continue the process. Leave jars untouched for 2-3 bells, siphon or carefully drain ⅔ of the liquid, leave the settlement at the bottom. Gently replace removed liquid with clean water, repeat this process 2-3 times until the water in the jar is clear. Once clear, drain as much water as possible and leave to dry. This same method can be applied to Indigofera leaves to obtain a darker richer blue.
    Second Method: The same method as red with the Crozophora Tinctoria, leaving out the addition of the lime soak. Juice directly from the seed will dye the cloth blue but will have a tendency to lighten to violet. Ammonia can be used to force the color to brighten. Although this is not broken down into a powder form, a binder is not needed and can be directly applied.

    c. Yellow - Method: Reseda Luteola

VI.III Minerals -
    a. Red -

    b. Blue - Azurite, Cuprorivaite and Lapis Lazuli use the process of mortar and pestle to grind the different stones into a fine powder. The process is very simple but tedious and will require strength and endurance to get the powder to the right consistency. Once you feel satisfied with the texture you'll then move to the next step of combining it with a binder to create your paint.

    Inorganic colors can be created using Philtering and mixing the appropriate mineral/chemical compounds together. Most vibrant blue colors are derived from this method instead of the organic method, in which blues tend to fade easily. Method: Cobalt - 1g Cobalt chloride and 5g aluminum chloride are homogenized in a mortar and heated in a test tube with a gas burner for about 3 to 4 minutes. (Note: Will need 100% binder and dries quickly in oil.)
    Ultramarine - Kaolinite (decomposed granite), soda ash and coal mixed together then baked in a closed oven/kiln for an hour and then allowed to cool. Once cool, wash to remove excess sodium sulfate, dry and ground until the proper degree of fineness is obtained.

    c. Yellow - Urine can be collected and dried, producing not so pleasant smelling hard yellow balls of the raw pigment. Method: Collect in small pots, cool, then concentrate over a fire. Filter the liquid through cloth and the sediment will collect into the balls. Dry over a fire and/or in the sun. You can break it down further by washing and purifying the balls to separate into greenish and yellow phases.

VI.IV Berries

VII. Techniques & Styles -
    a. Distemper - The technique of painting on distempered surfaces blends watercolors with whiting and glue. The colors are mixed with whitening, or finely-ground chalk, and tempered with size. The whitening makes them opaque and gives them body, but is also the cause of their drying light. A source of considerable embarrassment to the inexperienced eye is that the colors when wet present such a different appearance from what they do when dry.

    b. Oil/Water Tempura -

    c. Acrylic -

    d. Fresco -

    e. Gouache -

    f. Water color -

    g. Water miscible oil paints -

VII.I Brushes

VII.II Cloth & Miscellaneous

VIII. Workspace & Requirements - Mussel shells can be used as a palette for paints. Cut wood can also be used for palettes.

IX. Oil-Based Paints vs. Water-Based Paints - Many colors, such as lead white and umber can affect the drying of oil; others such as vermillion can retard this process. Overall dense, heavy pigments dry well and quickly, and require little oil. Oil paints can be blended to create infinitely fine gradations even with ordinary brushes. Both the natural opacity of some pigments and transparency of others can be exploited to suggest a truly vast array of optical effects. Great quantities of oil paint can be applied to obtain textured surfaces while at the same time it permits the artist to create fine detail with ease.

X. Binders - A material or substance that holds or draws other materials together to form a cohesive substance. A pigment should not dissolve or be affected by the binding medium. In order to produce good oil paint, pigment and binder are ground into a stiff paste which must have three requirements: it must be brushable, adhere permanently to the surface and it must not alter significantly in time. Some pigments require long periods of grinding to make them usable and some must be ground only shortly otherwise they quickly lose their natural brilliance. Some pigments, like ultramarine, produce a fastidious stringy paint, to solve this additives may be introduced such as wax, alum, chalk or dryers to correct deficiencies or augment inherent properties. Linseed, nut and poppy oil are more popular binders.

    a. Poppy Oil/Linseed Oil/Soybean Oil/Olive Oil/Tung Oil -

    b. Gum Aarabic

    d. Lead - When mixed with a sizeA form of distemper painting.

    e. Egg (Water-base) - Egg yolk tempera, a gelatinous water-based binder presents serious limitations for painters used to the flexibility of oil painting. It can be difficult to work with but it a source that can be available if nothing else is. Tempera paint can not be stored, each color will need mixed when needed and once dry on the palette, cannot be used again. Small areas can only be painted at a time because of how quickly it dries and makes blending colors difficult, however this is the most common binder as eggs are easily available in most regions. Generally competent and higher skilled painters can make this binder work.

    f. Beeswax

    g. Honey

    h. Glue (Oil-base) - Made from boiling of hoofs, bones, or skin of animals and then mixing the hard gelatinous residue with water. Can also be created by boiling vegetation, also known as gum. This is a form of distemper painting.

    i. Pitch (Oil-base) - Unstable for use in oil painting, especially when mixed with the most common diluents, such as linseed oil. Unless thoroughly diluted, pitch never fully solidifies and will in time corrupt the other pigments with which it comes into contact and has been known to buckle canvas. Pitch can be used as a glaze to set in shadow or mixed with other colors to render a darker tone. Novices can use this, but the desired look may not be acquired.

    j. Water (Water-base) - Some pigments will not dissolve in water and this source is extremely transparent.

X.I Additives - Besides the three main categories of ingredients, paint can have a wide variety of additives, which are usually added in small amounts can provide a significant effect. Some reasons for additives include modifying surface tension, improving flow, improving finished appearance, increasing wet edge, improving pigment stability, imparting antifreeze properties and controlling foam.

    a. Alum -

    b. Chalk - Combined with sizeSize is either egg whites, blood, rabbit skin glue diluted and heated in water (water gilding) or boiled linseed oil (oil gilding), acting as a filler or glaze., a gelatinous substance used in paper making, this provides a more consistent and precise painting surface. It allows paints to remain on the surface of the paper and to dry there, rather than be absorbed into the paper. This is a form of distemper painting.

    c. Lime - Combined with sizeSize is either egg whites, blood, rabbit skin glue diluted and heated in water (water gilding) or boiled linseed oil (oil gilding), acting as a filler or glaze. this makes a consistent and precise painting surface. It allows paints to remain on the surface of the paper and to dry there, rather than be absorbed into the paper. This is a form of distemper painting.

X.II Solvent - A volatile liquid used to obtain desired viscosity and flow of paint. It keeps the solid components of paint in suspension and also influences the adhesion properties of the surface. It is an optional component of paint. After application of paint evaporates the solvent tends to leave a solid dry film on the surface. Most common solvents used are water and mineral spirits. Water is used in acrylic paints, while mineral spirits are used in oil based paints.

XI. Skill Progression
Novice - Has difficulty mixing more technical binders with pigments. Does not have access to creating or accessing the more rare of colors pigments. Most commonly uses colors which are easily accessible; urine, blood, berries, nuts, plants. Their technique is rough and child-like, images are sometimes indiscernible from one to the next.
Competent
Expert
Master
Last edited by Firenze on July 11th, 2015, 6:56 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Painting Skill Interest

Postby Alses on July 10th, 2015, 9:38 pm

Image

Just a quick note, as per instructions: IRL, the molluscs that make the purple colour (tyrian purple) are Murex snails :D

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Alses
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