[Gillar's Scrapbook] Diary of a Madman

(This is a thread from Mizahar's fantasy role playing forum. Why don't you register today? This message is not shown when you are logged in. Come roleplay with us, it's fun!)

The player scrapbooks forum is literally a place for writers to warm-up, brainstorm, keep little scraps of notes, or just post things to encourage themselves and each other. Each player can feel free to create their own thread - one per account - and use them accordingly.

[Gillar's Scrapbook] Diary of a Madman

Postby Gillar on October 16th, 2014, 8:01 am

Over the years, I've developed a rather large amount of information regarding the Isur, Izurdin and all manner of related topics. Even with all of the available info, there is still room for more elaboration on various aspects of the race. I want to lay some of it out here and then try and get it adapted into the Lore.

One of the things that I feel I need to expand upon involves the differences between isur who live in and around the Kingdom and those who do not. The overwhelming majority of the current info on the isur, aside from the racial basics, is geared more toward what I will refer to here as, "True" Isur. These are the isur who live in and around the Kingdom and accept Izurdin as their primary deity although other marks may also be found. Family, clan, race and Izurdin are the driving aspects of the isur's life.

A "True" Isur may in some cases be one who was born and raised within the Kingdom but for one reason or another left. These isur still maintain most of the qualities that their Kingdom-bound brethren hold dear but carry them on in places far from home. Izurdin is still the driving force of their religion although other deities may have placed their marks as well. The Kingdom may not be as important to these isur but it is a part of them and is never forgotten. These isur are not ones who have been banished or otherwise forced out of the Kingdom. They have left on their own for reasons that do not blatantly go against the values the isur hold dear (this can vary depending on the clan of course). An "True" Isur does not assimilate well into other societies because they still hold many of the racial prejudices and biases that have developed over centuries. While they may learn to adapt to life outside the Kingdom among non-isur, they never truly fit in.

Now, "True" Isur, both Kingdom-bound and Wanderers (another temporary term), are accepted into isur society within the Kingdom. The majority of the established information on the isur applies to these individuals. This includes access to Citadels, Clan Cities and organizations such as The Anvils, Izurdin's Hammer and the Silver Tower. However, these things are only available with the understanding that the individual maintains a good standing with the Kingdom or at the very least isn't in bad standing.

When it comes to the organizations, Anvils are the most common type of "True" Isur found outside of the Kingdom. This is because carrying the word of Izurdin to the outside world can be seen as a religious calling. In Pre-Valterrian times, the Isur were often regarded as teachers and engineers who used their industrial knowledge, great patience and immense strength to better the lives of all races. Although such things have faded drastically and in many ways went the opposite direction, for the Anvils, it is still something that many regard as an important part of their faith.

Izurdin's Hammer is almost exclusively Kingdom-bound as they are the primary defenders of the Kingdom from the outside world. One does not become a Hammer and then simply leave the Kingdom to go on their own as doing so only serves to weaken the Hammer against outside threats. Exceptions may include reconnaissance missions but even then it would only be to locations not all that far outside the borders of the Kingdom.

Sentinels of the Silver Tower, like the Anvils, may be found outside of the Kingdom performing duties for the Tower or taking on questions/missions to retrieve information/secrets that may be beneficial to the Tower. That said, this only happens to a rare few and even then only to those who have somehow proven they are loyal, trustworthy and stable to the Tower and to the Kingdom.

This brings me no to what I will call for lack of a current better term, "Fringe" Isur. Fringe Isur are those who have been born and raised outside of the Kingdom or who have left for one reason or another and do not carry on the qualities that the "True" Isur value so dearly. They may or may not remain devoted to Izurdin. They may remember or have heard of the Kingdom but do not claim any loyalty to it. Due to their distance, both physical and metaphysical, from the Kingdom and their race as a larger whole, they find it easier to assimilate into non-isur societies. They may even become valued, productive members of these societies. This would be the isurian smith working in a non-isur city for example. They are more easily accepted by these same societies as well. They stand out from non-isur however not in an awkward way but more as a unique, gifted, respected individual.

Unfortunately for the "Fringe" Isur, their separation from the Kingdom leaves them being viewed by the "True" Isur as only a little bit better than a non-isur. The perception is that by never having been much of a part of the Kingdom, the "Fringe" Isur is more out-of-touch with what it is to be a "True" Isur. While this may not necessarily be true, it is the perception and perception is everything. As a result, a "Fringe" Isur will find it basically impossible to ever be accepted as a member of Izurdin's Hammer as the Hammer are fanatical about the Kingdom and its protection. Also, the Silver Tower would be against taking on a "Fringe" Isur as an Initiate because of the perceived high probability that the individual would take the knowledge they've gained from the Tower and use it elsewhere for purposes not supported by the Tower. The Sentinels are EXTREMELY possessive of their secrets and magical knowledge to the point of eliminating those who dare go against their wishes. Remember, the Pitrius Clan controls the Tower and they are not the most accepting of the Clans to say the least. The Anvils are a bit more tolerating and accepting of "Fringe" Isur than the other two organizations however their fanatical faith in Izurdin ties them inevitably to the Isur as a race. If an isur does not accept both Izurdin and their race as the driving forces in their lives, the Anvils, while remaining tolerant, will not accept the individual into their ranks.

An important item of note regarding magical pursuits; "True" Isur prefer magecraft to all other forms of magic although the Sentinels do offer training (to the most deserving) in Reimancy, Voiding, Shielding, Alchemy, Glyphing, Magecraft and Summoning. A "True" Isur will never engage in the use of Flux and practicing Leeching is seen as an extreme form of weakness also not found in "True" Isur. Malediction is also frowned on as it is seen as a lesser form of magic than Magecraft. For "Fringe" Isur, Malediction isn't seen in such a bad light as they do not have access to the Magecraft resources found in the Kingdom. Leeching is still not seen as acceptable and Flux is still never sought after.

One form of "Fringe" Isur is the one who rejects Izurdin and/or their race as being a positive, driving force in their life. These are the isur who have been banished or have left on negative terms. They may also be ones who have never been in the Kingdom and have no real care about it or the pursuit of those qualities that "True" Isur value. These isur are regarded by "True" Isur and may even other "Fringe" Isur as being no better and even much worse than a non-isur. They are never allowed into the Kingdom and would likely be killed if they tried to get in. Otherwise, these isur may enjoy lives lived among non-isur and even become successful, welcomed members of those societies.

So how does one know if their character is to be considered a "True" Isur or a "Fringe" Isur. To sum it up, if your character is devoted to Izurdin as their primary deity (yes, you can still have marks from other gods but Izurdin is the most important), has strong ties to their isur family and clan (meaning you have been born and raised in the Kingdom and have not separated from either on bad terms), views their race as the most precious (may still be accepting of others but the isur are most important) and keeps the good of the family, clan, race and Izurdin as a high priority in life or at least a driving motivation, then the character is generally going to be considered a "True" Isur.

If your character was not born and raised in the Kingdom or maybe was but has not maintained strong ties, does not see themselves as a part of the Kingdom; maybe only giving a nod to it at best, considers their real home to be anywhere other than the Kingdom, places any deity above Izurdin, acts in ways that do not hold the family, clan, race or Izurdin as important, driving factors in life (or maybe just gives a simple half-hearted nod to such things), chances are your character is a "Fringe" Isur.

I want to clarify however that neither type is better or worse than the other. They are simply different and enjoy different benefits. If a character can be considered a "True" Isur, they can benefit from all that the Kingdom has to offer. If a character is a "Fringe" Isur, they may find more acceptance in the outside world and may navigate it much easier and with greater results. The problems only really come into play when a "True" Isur tries to extend the benefits they get from the Kingdom to the world outside or when a "Fringe" Isur tries to partake in the benefits of the Kingdom.

While I am on the topic of the Isur, I want to address a few more elements that I have yet to detail in the Lore. The first thing is the Sentinels of the Silver Tower. The Sentinels are a unique entity in not just Mizahar but among the isur as well. Unlike many other magical institutions in Mizahar, it does not attempt to compete with Sahova nor does it try to mimic it. The Silver Tower is a creation of the Pitrius Clan with a primary purpose of managing the practice of magic use throughout the Kingdom. It is not a research facility or a center of learning where all isur may find a home or even an outlet for their magical interests. The Sentinels monitor magic throughout the Kingdom and either assimilate it if it is deemed beneficial or eliminate it if is deemed a threat. Those who are brought to the Tower are taught how to practice magic responsibly in service to the Pitrius Clan, the Kingdom and Izurdin, basically in that order. There is no room for failure so if one does not live up to the expectations of the Instructors and the Elders. Thus, one does not fail and then continue on practicing magic out of the sight of the Sentinels.

Getting accepted as an Initiate at the Tower isn't always voluntary either. If one is found to have the potential for practicing magic or is already practicing it, they are approached by a full Sentinel and given a choice, either come to the Silver Tower for evaluation or risk banishment from the Kingdom or even death by refusing. One does not simply apply to the Tower or get sent there. They have to be approach by a Sentinel or have some sort of family tie to an existing Sentinel who then brings them to the Tower to be tested. From there, one of two things happens. First, if discovered by a Sentinel and brought to the Tower, the would-be Initiate must pass the three Tests, one of the mind, one of the body and one of the soul. If they pass, they are made official Initiates and work with Instructors to develop an area of study that would best suit them and the Tower. If they fail, they usually die as a direct result of the failure or are otherwise "removed" due to being perceived as a threat to themselves and the Kingdom as a whole.

If one is accepted as an Initiate due to family ties and/or due to someone at the Tower having an expressed interest in the person, they are allowed some time to prepare themselves for the Tests before having to take them. During this time, the Initiate is allowed to remain in the Tower and are taught a bit about the Sentinels and the Tower including how it all came to be, the history of magic among the isur and the importance of the Tests. This is meant to provide the Initiate with at least some context as to why they are at the Tower and the importance of being there.

The Tests come when the Initiate least expects them. They are a mixture of illusion, hypnosis and real, physical hardships. The tests are meant to sift through the weak of body, weak of mind and weak of soul for these three aspects of an individual must be solid if they are to be of any use to the Tower and to the Kingdom. If the Initiate is able to pass the tests to the satisfaction of the Instructors, they are named an Apprentice and are granted the right to study magic at the Tower. Their studies are meant to mold and shape them into becoming full Sentinels who are capable of not only managing magical practices in the Kingdom but also able to defend the Kingdom from outside magical threats.

It cannot be expressed enough that the Tower is VERY strict when it comes to its teaching of magic. The Pitrius Clan founded and operates the Tower. They are secretive, defensive and brutal when it comes to their knowledge of magic. They do not take anything related to magic lightly. This is why "Fringe" Isur are not allowed to study at the Tower. That said, if a "Fringe" Isur were to be discovered practicing magic within the boundaries of the Kingdom, they would still be approached by a Sentinel. How would a Sentinel know that an isur is not a "True" Isur? Remember that all Isur are born with the mark of Izurdin and all who share the same mark can recognize one of their own. Among the Isur, this is amplified due to the racial religious fanaticism shared by all "True" Isur. When a "True" Isur meets a "Fringe" Isur, both can feel the strength of one's bond to Izurdin and that feeling is what clues a Sentinel in to just how devoted to the race an isur is. It's not an immediate detection kind of thing where the isur knows everything about another isur. It's just a feeling one has as to how close one holds family, clan, race and Izurdin. While many isur may perceive and react to this feeling differently than others, the Sentinels have only one perception; if you waver at all, you are not worthy.

Now, on to Izurdin's Hammer. Becoming a Hammer is to some extent, much easier than becoming a Sentinel. That being said, it is still far from a simple task. A would-be Hammer must present themselves to a ranking Hammer and request formal evaluation. They present their qualifications, have someone, preferably another Hammer, backup their claims, and then they must duel an existing Hammer in a wrestling match. It doesn't really matter if they win or lose as it all comes down to how they performed. Of course if they lose and lose bad, they won't make it in but if they put forth a good effort and it shows, they have a good chance of making it. In the end though, only "True" Isur with EXTREME devotion to family, clan, race and Izurdin will be allowed to join and even then, only those who show unwavering loyalty to the King and the Kingdom will make the final cut.

The Anvils, as mentioned before, are the most open of the three groups. To become a member, one must be unwaveringly devoted to Izurdin above all others. They must also show exceptional ability in crafting, be it blacksmithing, carpentry, jewelcrafting, etc. While devotion to family, clan and race are extremely important, there is none more important than Izurdin. This is the only group that may, I repeat, MAY, accept a "Fringe" Isur into their formal ranks but only if that isur can show that their faith in Izurdin is the driving force in their lives and that their family, clan and race combined come in at a close second.
User avatar
Gillar
Forging the World
 
Posts: 1107
Words: 902415
Joined roleplay: March 23rd, 2009, 6:44 pm
Race: Isur
Office
Medals: 1
Featured Contributor (1)

[Gillar's Scrapbook] Diary of a Madman

Postby Gillar on March 23rd, 2015, 2:31 am

Gods, Goddesses, Gnosis Marks


I'm not sure if it is the fault of the Founders, the Staff or the Players; maybe its a little bit of each, but I think there is an extreme misunderstanding going on regarding the divine, their marks and mortal reactions to the gods. More specifically, how a mortal reacts when in the presence of the divine be it for the purpose of being marked or any other encounter. I lost count long ago of how may gnosis threads and gnosis help desk requests that don't even scratch the surface of how one should be behaving in the presence of the divine. There are some who do relatively well with it but even then I don't think the true magnitude is realized.

So much of what I read regarding interactions between mortals and gods leaves me with the imagery of a mortal sitting down for a cup of coffee with a god and discussing how worthy they are of getting a mark. It literally makes my eyeballs itch sometimes. While it is true that the gods of Mizahar roam the lands, meddling in mortal affairs and interacting with mortals in countless ways, this does not change the fact that these beings are still gods. They are responsible for aspects of existence that go far beyond just a symbol or a single interaction.

Let's take Dira for example, one of my favorite Mizahar deities. Death is one of, if not the most, important aspect of life. It frames nearly everything one does in life. It has countless feelings, thoughts, emotions and events tied to it; most quite sad, painful and often horrifying and brutal at times. Now, imagine that every death and everything associated with every death ever (I mean every death and everything associated with every death from the beginning of time until the end of time) is focused into a single being. Then imagine that being suddenly appears before you in all their divine splendor. You aren't going to be holding your head up, meeting its gaze and then talking to it like it was just another person. It doesn't apply to only Dira either. Even one such as Sylir, God of Peace and Civilization would warrant a profound reaction. This is a god who represents all of civilization, the source of sentient beings coming together to form a cohesive society. All of civilization from the beginning of all things to the end of all things is centered on this one being.

So a god chooses to appear before your character. A god (or goddess) who represents EVERYTHING associated with a certain element of existence; everything that has ever existed or will exist that is tied to that element. This being, the center of so much energy, power, influence and every single emotion, thought, feeling and experience related to their divine domain now stands before you. You are going to feel overwhelming insignificance, no matter who you are or how powerful you may think you are. You are going to feel the crushing weight of just how unimportant you are pounding down upon you. This feeling of infinite insignificance will bring about equally strong feelings of fear and uncertainty. These feelings of fear and uncertainty however will quickly bring about some level of curiosity. Why are you not dead yet? Why hasn't the sheer force of this being's presence crushed you out of existence? Why are they there to begin with? What do they want?

Curiosity helps to lighten the situation just enough to allow for some level of functionality in your character. This leads to an atmosphere more suited for possibly discussion yet still it remains framed in the idea that you are standing before a being so superior to yourself that its all you can do not to soil yourself right then and there.

This is where the god would introduce themselves (even if no introduction is necessary) and begin to inform the character of the purpose for their visit. During this experience, NEVER should or would your character treat things as if it were just another meeting with a stranger. No matter how welcoming, nice or kind the deity is, your character is still in the direct presence of a god.

Now let's say you've done something significant enough to bring the deity to you. By significant enough I mean something far above and beyond simply taking an interest in the gods area of influence. In the case of Dira, simply not being afraid of death is not enough. With Krysus, simply killing someone by accident isn't enough. With Vayt, poisoning your grandmother isn't enough. With Rhysol, backstabbing your sister whom you've hated since childhood isn't enough. Remember, you are an insignificant speck of dirt on the bottom of a divine boot until you've done something that earns you the right to maybe become something more.

So what get's the attention of the divine? Doing something that isn't by accident is a good step in the right direction. Doing something that stands out from the daily examples of whatever it is you are going to do. What do I mean by that? For example, people are betrayed and lied to countless times every single day since the beginning of existence until the end. What makes your act of betrayal or your lie any greater? What makes it great enough that the God of Lies and Betrayal, the Father of Corruption and Minister of Evil, Rhysol, would look at you any different than he would any other insignificant mortal? Again, the same goes for any other god. What makes your lack of fear of death any more significant than any other? What makes your hatred for the undead or your respect for death great enough that Dira, Death personified, would bother with you?

Going back to the deity appearing to your character, let's say they are their to mark your character. On top of everything else that has come with the experience of meeting a god in the flesh, that god is there to reward you by marking you with their symbol. They are sharing a sliver of themselves with you. Such a reward is forever life-changing even soul-changing. The event should leave your character feeling intense feelings of humility, respect, thankfulness and an overwhelming desire to do even more for this being who has honored you in such a way.

I'm not saying with all this that a character should be pissing themselves and cowering in a corner when a god appears but there should be a VERY STRONG acknowledgement that the being standing before you IS A GOD. Of course, the more marks you have from a god the closer you will feel with them and the more comfortable you are in their presence. Once you are marked, I kind of equate it to an occupation. With one mark, your the new employee and the god is your boss. You are quite nervous around the boss. You don't want to be seen doing something they wouldn't approve of. You try to do everything in your power to look good and get a raise or a promotion. When the boss comes around, you are very respectful, obedient and humble.

At two marks, you've gotten your promotion. You and your boss have gotten a bit closer. You may go out to the bar from time to time with the boss and a few of your colleagues. The boss may even invite you out for a game of golf. You are still respectful and know there are boundaries and lines you don't cross. You both share a few inappropriate jokes from time to time. The boss gives you the better projects to complete.

Three marks and you're sleeping with the boss. You get favors others don't and are held to a much higher standard than others. Things you do are noticed more and the boss keeps an eye on you. You and the boss share feelings, dreams and desires. You may even one day get married to the boss. Problem is that the boss is still the boss so there remain boundaries and lines you don't cross yet the boss is more forgiving if you slip up once or twice.

Four marks and the boss has adopted you as their own child. There is little they wouldn't do for you and vice versa. Although you aren't the biological child, you enjoy almost the same treatment and rewards, occasionally even better, than the "real" son or daughter does. Of course there still remains the chance you may get spanked if you do something wrong but in the end, the god will forgive.

Now these types of comfort levels and such with a god really only applies to the number of marks you have from that particular god. If you encounter another god who hasn't marked you or you haven't been around much at all, you're going to feel much like you did before you were ever marked by any god. The difference would be that the more contact you have with the divine in general, the more comfortable you will be; within reason. It all depends on how many marks you may have overall and how many times you've been in the presence of the divine. See the previous analogy.

So, I guess what I'm getting at with all this is that the gods, while known for mingling with mortals, are still gods. When they reveal their true identity to your character, you should be reacting in a way that best represents the fact that you are standing before a being so far beyond you that with the slightest thought, you could be wiped from existence or be elevated to unimaginable greatness. This is a being that is responsible for some element of existence; every aspect of that element and everything related to it since the beginning of things until the end. Meeting a god and/or gaining a mark should reshape your entire character; all the way to the deepest part of their soul. Take such an event seriously.
User avatar
Gillar
Forging the World
 
Posts: 1107
Words: 902415
Joined roleplay: March 23rd, 2009, 6:44 pm
Race: Isur
Office
Medals: 1
Featured Contributor (1)

[Gillar's Scrapbook] Diary of a Madman

Postby Elias Caldera on March 23rd, 2015, 4:46 am

I know I'm guilty of reacting to the presence of a god with a less than appropriate attitude considering the grandeur of the situation. In fact, I still cringe sometimes when I look back at the relatively short amount of dialogue I had in my initial gnosis request.
Last edited by Elias Caldera on March 23rd, 2015, 7:26 am, edited 1 time in total.
Mostly active on the Sundays

Ebonstryfe | Ravok | Codex | Black Sun

Templates
User avatar
Elias Caldera
The Edgiest of Edge Lords
 
Posts: 596
Words: 668706
Joined roleplay: September 14th, 2013, 1:28 am
Location: Ravok
Race: Human
Character sheet
Storyteller secrets
Scrapbook
Journal
Plotnotes
Medals: 3
Featured Thread (1) Overlored (1)
Ravok Seasonal Challenge (1)

[Gillar's Scrapbook] Diary of a Madman

Postby Pulren Marsh on March 23rd, 2015, 5:52 am

Thanks for writing this article, Gillar. I think that magic has become so readily overrun with popularity that the trend is start living in a pure high fantasy world where the congress of energies both magical and divine begin to take on a mundane feel. People become jaded in a way that takes away the very aspects of fantasy that drew them in the first place. Pulren has only been aware of Gods in the forms of Dira and how he has felt as if he has slipped Her grasp, which in turn caused him to give Her deaths of others in some twisted form of a consolation. Of course, this concept is ridiculous in an ooc fashion, but to Pulren it is as real as kelp.

Same with Rak'keli. When he was Leeched nearly to death, the quick attention of Aoren brought an immediate respect for the healing Goddess, as Her intervention through Aoren was the only thing that save Pulren. As he learns about the Gods and Goddesses of Mizahar, all he can do is respect their power, much as he fears the gravity of magic and its weight as far as potential madness.

So, yeah, thanks for this. When I used to MUD, the appearance of a Deity was so massive that you could feel a shared holding of breath by everyone in the room as this omnipresence appeared and was felt by us all. Even in such a completely imagined landscape, the presences of those Deities still humble me even in the memory.
Image


Image
User avatar
Pulren Marsh
Your favorite Uncle
 
Posts: 720
Words: 453329
Joined roleplay: March 22nd, 2014, 3:33 am
Location: Zeltiva
Race: Human
Character sheet
Storyteller secrets
Plotnotes
Medals: 2
Overlored (1) Mizahar Grader (1)

[Gillar's Scrapbook] Diary of a Madman

Postby Gillar on July 27th, 2016, 5:19 am

With the return of Ravok, I am feeling the need to speak again on the Black Sun and the Ebonstryfe. I've already spoke at length earlier in this thread about both but I can't help but think there is still some confusion. The Black Sun is Rhysol's priesthood. Within Ravok, they are highly respected and feared. They spread the idea that Rhysol is the source of safety and security in a world wrought with chaos. They preach that faith in Rhysol, in dedicating all that one is to Him and living to serve Him, one will benefit from the blessings only He can give. Their proof is the safety and security (relative) citizens enjoy living in Ravok. They speak on the horrors found outside of the city and how, even if life in Ravok isn't perfect for all, it is still better than not living there.

Outside of Ravok, the Black Sun works to establish covert religious cells from which to operate. Agents and Acolytes of the Black Sun are tasked to seek out and capture fragments or pieces of broken deities which are then handed over to Rhysol. They also work with members of the Ebonstryfe to spread chaos and corruption throughout other societies. The Black Sun works to convert others to Rhysol by secretly breaking down and destroying everything a person holds dear in life and then offering an escape from it all through Rhysol. Rhysol's mark offers a type of control over the defilement of others thus filling the hole in one's soul with evil and corruption. While Agents and Acolytes of the Black Sun spread their corruption in a less physical way, the Ebonstryfe works a bit differently.

The Ebonstryfe, while often working alongside the Black Sun, tend to be a bit more brutal in their exploits. Inside Ravok, they act as the secret police, the militant arm of the Black Sun. They are responsible for the disappearances of those who dare challenge the will of Rhysol. They are also responsible for managing a sort of controlled chaos within the city. It is not unheard of for Soldiers of the Ebonstryfe to go undercover and blend into various aspects of society for the sake of causing conflict. By orchestrating thefts, assassinations, defamation, coups and other foul deeds, all in secret and behind the scenes, the Soldiers spread corruption and betrayal without themselves being implicated.

Outside of Ravok, the Soldiers perform tasks similar to those in the city. They seek out potential threats to Rhysol and work to corrupt and destroy them. They infiltrate all levels of society and spread corruption and ruin. Unlike the Black Sun, they do not seek to convert or bring others to Rhysol. They seek only to bring about the slow, twisted, torturous downfall of society and everything related to it.

Now, to be a Soldier of the Ebonstryfe or an Agent/Acolyte of the Black Sun, one's life must be dedicated to Rhysol in mind, body and soul. This is true dedication and not an act of lip service just to gain prestige and power. One's personal ambitions are second to the will of Rhysol. In order to become a member of either group, one forever gives themselves to Rhysol. After that, they dedicate their lives to serving the Black Sun and/or the Ebonstryfe in the quest to serve Rhysol. Just serving Rhysol doesn't make one a member of either group, they have to actively serve one of these organizations in order to benefit from what there is to be had.

Actually becoming a member of one of these groups is a life-changing event that will forever shape a person. Characters who choose this path find there is no turning back. Lack of devotion and/or dedication to the organization and/or Rhysol will result in being hunted down and destroyed. Too many characters, past and present, claim affiliation with the Black Sun and/or the Ebonstyfe without giving the required effort to maintain such ties. Again, simply saying, "Oh, I'm evil, I like Rhysol, I once did a quest to become a Soldier" isn't nearly enough. Also, if you are not actively working to serve one of these groups, you do not get ANY of the benefits, including pay. Serving other deities above or against Rhysol will also bring about his wrath. Remember, if you are of the Black Sun or Ebonstryfe, you are marked by Rhysol. He knows where you are and how to find you at all times. While he may not lower himself to face you personally, you can bet that he will send others to do it.

Also, one may ask, "If Rhysol is the God of Chaos, why does he have organized groups serving him?" Before the Valterrian, there wasn't as much order to Rhysol's following. As a result, despite being one of the most powerful deities, he was never able to gain enough earthly power and influence to really be the threat that he was capable of being. It wasn't until the Valterrian and Rhysol's murder of Sylir, that opportunity truly presented itself. Rhysol's new Voice during that time and for centuries after, convinced him that by twisted and corrupting the things that made civilization solid, productive and good, he could attain the greatness he desired. So, by defiling the ideas that Sylir held dear, Rhysol birthed a new city, Ravok, a twisted mirror of Syliras. The Ebonstryfe was a defiled mirror of the Syliran Knights and through a corrupt, controlled sense of ordered chaos, Rhysol was able to find the foothold he needed to increase his power. Without a bit of order to direct it, chaos can never be anything more than simply chaos. Twisting the idea of peace, order and civilization causes greater suffering over the long run thus working to feed Rhysol's hunger for something greater.
User avatar
Gillar
Forging the World
 
Posts: 1107
Words: 902415
Joined roleplay: March 23rd, 2009, 6:44 pm
Race: Isur
Office
Medals: 1
Featured Contributor (1)

Previous

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Roberx45dtkah and 0 guests